Bob Moses, Junot Diaz, Barbara Ransby, and More Share History, Ideas, and Inspiration

These past couple of months have been filled with powerful presentations and dialogues with a host of noted authors. Here are just a few of the authors that Teaching for Change has helped to schedule and co-host at Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC in the spring of 2013.

 

February 28
My Name is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl’s Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize

jody-williams

March 4
A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organizing for School Reform 

match-on-dry-grass
Co-editors Mark R. Warren and Karen L. Mapp talked about the successes and challenges faced by community-based school reform efforts across the country. The event was co-sponsored by NCPIE and others.

March 11
Lessons from the Heartland: A Turbulent Half-Century of Public Education in an Iconic American City

heartland-lessons2
Author Barbara Miner was interviewed by Bill Fletcher Jr. about the lessons learned in Milwaukee about school reform, in particular school “choice.”

March 12
Eslanda: The Large and Unconventional Life of Mrs. Paul Robeson 

eslanda
Historian Barbara Ransby (best known for her book on Ella Baker) was interviewed by the author and professor Clarence Lusane about the remarkable yet little known life of Eslanda Robeson. The event was introduced by the chair of the Howard University Department of Afro American Studies, Greg Carr.

March 28
This is How You Lose Her
and Quality Education as a Constitutional Right

moses-and-diaz
Award-winning author Junot Diaz and SNCC veteran/founder of the Algebra Project Bob Moses spoke at two events for the Young People’s Project in Mississippi. There was literally a line out the door for both events.

 

Don’t miss our upcoming author events.

Posted Wednesday, April 3, 2013 |

Stay Connected

Subscribe to our newsletters for updates on Teaching for Change news and events.

View Our Photos

View More Photos

Donate

Your donation to Teaching for Change (a 501-c-3) is tax-deductible and helps us provide teachers and parents with tools to create schools where students learn to read, write, and change the world.



Print