Resources: 2021 Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In

Indigenous Land: Stewardship, Relationships, and Responsibility

Thank you for attending the 2021 Indigenous Peoples’ Day Curriculum Teach-In. Below find resources from each session. For additional teaching resources, see the NMAI’s Native Knowledge 360° website and the Zinn Education Project’s Teach Climate Justice campaign.


Keynote Session

Dr. Kelsey Leonard


Making Land Acknowledgement Meaningful

Renée Gokey


NATIVE VOICES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Dr. Debbie Reese


VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP DEMONSTRATION: AMERICAN INDIAN REMOVAL

Michaela Pavlat and Gabrielle Lee

Availability for NMAI Virtual Field Trips are released monthly. Teachers will be able to register for November programs on October 1.


INKA ROAD, BRIDGE, AND LANDSCAPES

Dr. Isabel Hawkins


PIPELINE PROTESTS: PUTTING CLIMATE CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE INTO THE CURRICULUM (NECESSITY FILM)

Ursula Wolfe Rocca


“Nothing Was Discovered,  Everything Was Already Loved”: Critical Conceptions of Land in K-12 Curriculum

Dr. Leilani Sabzalian

Center for Humans and Nature: Questions for a Resilient Future

Juxtaposing Perspectives to Support Student’s Critical Thinking Activity

Other Resources described in the session

Recommended Books to Foster Anticolonial and Critical Indigenous Literacy

From the Slides: Plains Cree scholar Emma LaRocque in her book When the Other Is Me: Native Resistance Discourse, 1850-1990 shares how this civ/sav dichotomy also surfaces in a “double standard” in how Indigenous and Western societies are discussed:

“In this war of words, Whites explore, Indians wander; Whites have battles or victories, Indians massacre and murder; Whites scout, Indians lurk; …Whites defend themselves, Indians “wreak revenge”; ….Whites have “faiths” and so they pray; Indians have superstitions and so they conjure; (LaRocque, 2010, p. 50)