Featured Lessons & Resources


Resistance 101: A Lesson for Inauguration Teach-Ins and Beyond

Young people are looking for ways to make sense of our current political moment and resist injustice. Students need the opportunity to learn the history of people’s movements in order to deepen their protests into organizing that can win real change. To help introduce a history of resistance, Teaching for Change has created Resistance 101, a lesson for middle and high school classes… Read more.


Civil Rights Teaching

Teaching About Selma: We share here interactive lessons and recommended resources that invite students to step into the history and think critically and creatively about the continued fight for justice today.

Teaching About Freedom Schools: The Freedom Schools of the 1960s were part of a long line of efforts to liberate people from oppression using the tool of popular education.

Teaching About 1963: To support teaching the modern Civil Rights Movement beyond “I Have a Dream,” Teaching for Change recommends teaching about the 1963 events that shed light on the everyday people who organized in their communities to struggle for freedom and justice.

 


Teaching About Haiti

All too often in the midst of reporting on Haiti, we hear that the country is the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere without the infrastructure to deal with disaster. But little explanation is provided as to why, leaving students to assume it must be the fault of the people there. Nor do we hear of the strong grassroots Haitian organizations. It is important for students to gain a deeper understanding of the history and the roots of the poverty in Haiti. The U.S has been involved with Haiti for centuries, yet it has received little attention… Read more.

 

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