Teaching for Change 2016 Summer Reading and Writing Challenge

summer2016fbTeaching for Change challenges young people to read as many books as they can over the summer – especially multicultural and social justice books. We also encourage young people and their caregivers to examine the representation of Native Americans and people of color in the Scholastic catalog, and then write a letter advocating for multicultural books. Only 14% of children’s books published in 2014 were by or about people of color. Scholastic’s catalog is no exception.

Share our resources for examining books through the lens of critical literacy, and this summer set a goal to submit a letter to the #StepUpScholastic campaign.

Teaching for Change Summer Reading List

There are many more titles in our Teaching for Change We’re the People Summer Reading List and #Lemonade for Girls: in Formation.


BOARD BOOKS

Whose Knees Are These? I Love My Hair!
Shades of Black  I am Latino
Global Babies Please, Baby, Please

ELEMENTARY

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth, & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore Freedom on Congo Square
Joelito’s Big Decision / La Gran Decisión de Joelito   Mama’s Nightingale
Voice of Freedom Fannie Lou Hamer: The Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement Child of the Civil Rights Movement
When the Beat Was Born: DJ Kool Herc and the Creation of Hip Hop ¡Si, Se Puede! / Yes, We Can!
Those Shoes The Name Jar

MIDDLE SCHOOL AND YOUNG ADULT FICTION

Bayou Magic Stella by Starlight
Silver People APPROVED 4-6 Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal All American Boys
Caminar The Porcupine Year
A Little Piece of Ground Sylvia & Aki
Return to Sender In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse
The Glory Field A Wish After Midnight

MIDDLE SCHOOL AND YOUNG ADULT NON-FICTION

 

Passenger on the Pearl: The True Story of Emily Edmonson’s Flight from Slavery Understanding Mass Incarceration
Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom
The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment That Changed the World
Rad Women A- Z  A Young People’s History of the United States
A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America Brown Girl Dreaming
Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil Rights Days Enrique’s Journey: The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother

FOR EDUCATORS

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood… and the Rest of Y’All Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education Rethinking Sexism, Gender, and Sexuality
This is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education Pedagogy of the Oppressed: 30th Anniversary Edition
More Than a Score: The New Uprising Against High-Stakes Testing Beyond Heroes and Holidays: A Practical Guide to K-12 Anti-Racist, Multicultural Education and Staff Development
A People’s Curriculum for the Earth Teach for America Counter-Narratives: Alumni Speak Up and Speak Out

CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible
Putting the Movement Back Into Civil Rights Teaching: A Resource Guide for Classrooms and Communities I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle
Freedom’s Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC

ADULT FICTION AND NON-FICTION

Between the World and Me This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate
Americanah Claire of the Sea Light
The Defender: How Chicago’s Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America A People’s History of the United States
The New Jim Crow The Black History of the White House
An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City

There are many more titles in our Teaching for Change recommended booklists. We also suggest the We’re the People Summer Reading List and #Lemonade for Girls: in Formation.

Posted Tuesday, May 17, 2016 |

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