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Black History Month

Reverend Barber’s words below highlight why it is all the more important to study Black history in February and all year long. We need some moral fire to help us see clearly how this history shapes our present reality. I’ve heard too many people say over the past several months, ‘We’ve never seen anything like this …

Teaching Eyes on the Prize

Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954-1985 is an award-winning 14-hour television series produced by Blackside and narrated by Julian Bond. Through interviews and historical footage, the series covers major events of the civil rights movement from 1954-1985. Eyes on the Prize remains one of the preeminent resources for teaching the modern Civil Rights …

Who Killed Sammy Younge Jr.? SNCC, Vietnam, and the Fight for Racial Justice

  History may have forgotten, but we must not, that before Dr. King gave his now much-remembered Riverside Church declaration, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) had already uniquely and notoriously condemned the international hypocrisy of the United States in Vietnam, Africa, and the Caribbean in the face of the parallel Black liberation movement throughout …

The Confederate Flag: Symbol of Opposition to Civil Rights

The Confederate flag, best known as a symbol of white supremacy during the Civil War, was also a symbol of state resistance to human rights and democracy during the modern Civil Rights Movement. As Civil Rights Movement photographer Matt Herron explains, Southerners who believed in racial segregation displayed Confederate flags instead of the American flag. …

Selma in Kosciusko

  “Women can do just as much as men can when it comes to leadership.” This is just one of the comments made by students in Jessica Dickens’ class in Kosciusko, Mississippi. Dickens, a teacher the Kosciusko School District and Mississippi Civil Rights movement and Labor History teacher fellow, recently introduced the lesson, Stepping into Selma: …